Rose Hips found in Herbal Tea Zinger
Rose Hips is an ingredient found in our Herbal Tea Zinger product as shown above.
Ingredients contained are not sold separately from the product unless it's the only ingredient.
Rose Hips found in Vitamin C Complex
Rose Hips is an ingredient found in our Vitamin C Complex product as shown above.
Ingredients contained are not sold separately from the product unless it's the only ingredient.
Rose Hips found in Vitamin C 500mg
Rose Hips is an ingredient found in our Vitamin C 500mg product as shown above.
Ingredients contained are not sold separately from the product unless it's the only ingredient.

Rose hips have a long history of use in traditional medicine. The iron in rose hips make them an excellent supplement for menstruating women, and rose hip tea is a rich source of vitamin C, carrying all the benefits of that vitamin. In addition, the various flavonoids in rose hips have potent antioxidant action, helping to protect the body from the effects of stress, aging and the environment.

Rose hips can be used fresh or dried, shelled or powdered for medicinal purposes. To prepare them, cut the fruits open. For wine or a smooth texture in jellies or purees, remove the seeds. When you are ready to store them, do not use a metal container because the fruit acids can react with the metal, giving the hips an off flavor.

Rose hips develop on wild roses as the flowers drop off. The rose hip, also called the rose haw, is actually the fruit of the rose. The curative potential of rose hips – the fleshy red fruits of the dog rose and other types of wild and shrub roses – has been known since the Stone Age. Today, as then, the fruits are mashed into a vitamin-rich pulp and consumed raw or cooked. They are also often dried. Rose hips are used to prepare teas, extracts, purees or marmalades.

Rose hips, which have been helping out people suffering from the problem of aching joints and discomforting organs for years now, apparently bear a profile which is not known to a larger section of people. They are still being bothered by their ailments in their day to day lives and their quest for a solution towards aching joints is still unresolved. Rose hips , being natural extracts are highly attractive due to the very fact of generating no side effects. More importantly, they have been found to be greatly efficient towards providing joint relief. If not the former, the latter is worthwhile enough to think about the rosehips products for a try.

Rose hips are harvested from shrub-type Rugosa roses, which form large pods and have the best flavor. The hip — also called the seedpod or “haw” — is the center of the rose blossom that contains the flower’s seeds. Naturally, it isn’t noticeable when the flower is in bloom; it only becomes apparent when the petals fall off.

Rosehips are most commonly prepared for use in recipes as a puree or in syrup form. To make a puree, boil 4 to 5 cups of rose hips in enough water to cover for about 15 to 20 minutes, then strain. Return the rose hips to the pan with a lesser amount of water and repeat the process once or twice more to get additional puree.

Rose hips are particularly high in Vitamin C, with about 1700–2000 mg per 100 g in the dried product, one of the richest plant sources. Rose hips contain vitamins A, D and E, essential fatty acids and antioxidant flavonoids. As an herbal remedy, rose hips are attributed with the ability to prevent urinary bladder infections, and assist in treating dizziness and headaches. Rose hips are also commonly used externally in oil form to restore firmness to skin by nourishing and astringing tissue. Brewed into a concoction, can also be used to treat constipation.

Ripe rose hips from the variety Rosa rugosa start ripening in late August and are ready for picking in mid September.  About 80% of the rose hips ripen at the same time. However if picked as they ripen most of the crop can be harvested.  Though some rose hips are left for wildlife, the critters around here do not bother the fruit much.  The seeds are very hard, and only the outer red fruit casing is edible.  It takes some work to clean the fruit of tiny hairs and the tightly packed interior seeds.  The fruit is very tasty with a flavor that resembles apples and is well known for its high Vitamin C content.  Today the seeds are pressed for an oil that is nutritionally valuable.

These rose hips are from the variety Rosa rugosa which has a reputation for producing the largest rose hips which can weigh up to 10 grams each.  All are cut into about the same size pieces and then placed into an electric dehydrator.  If dried on medium heat and out of the sun then sealed in glass jars, stored in cabinet away from light, they hold their color up to two years.  If dried in the sun they turn dark brown or black.  Once they lose their color they also lose their Vit. C.  Generally herbs and dried fruits kept this way are good up to three years, some much longer.

Rose hips are also commonly used to make herbal teas, by boiling the dried or crushed rose hips for 10 minutes. About 2 tablespoons of berries are used per pint of water. A half-teaspoon of dried mint may be added to give a different flavor, or the acid-tasting tea may be sweetened. Rose hip tea may also be improved by blending with hibiscus flowers.

Rose hips provide a large dose of Vitamin C without an excessive amount of sugar and are even used to feed pets that typically fall deficient of this important vitamin. In the human world, they are used in a variety of dishes ranging from rose hip jelly to rose hip pie to rose hip sauces to rosehip fruit leathers into the beyond- even soup and nut bread! Rosehips perfectly complement many beverages and add a hint of romance to sparkling spirits like champagne, deepening the light notes and adding complexity.

To order online, click here :
http://www.newlife-today.com/order/